Sullivan County HUD Grant

November 12, 2020


HUD Awards More Than $12.3 Million to Protect New Hampshire Families from Lead and Other Home Health and Safety Hazards Funding to make low-income families’ homes safer and healthier

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) today awarded more than $12.3 million in New Hampshire to help state and local government agencies protect children and families from lead-based paint and home health hazards. This funding is part of $165 million being awarded nationally to 44 state and local government agencies in 23 states. The announcement comes during Lead Poising Prevention Week, Oct. 25-31.

“A healthy start at home translates to a successful life outside of the home,” said David Tille, HUD New England Regional Administrator. “HUD is committed to working with our New Hampshire grantees to eradicate lead paint poisoning to make sure our homes are safe and ensure positive outcomes for families and their kids.”

“I would like to thank HUD for awarding more than $12.3 million to the NH Housing Finance Authority and communities across New Hampshire,” said New Hampshire Governor Chris Sununu. “This effort, combined with the state’s Lead Paint Remediation Fund we created in our last state budget, will make a significant difference in ensuring households across the state are protected from lead poisoning and other health hazards.”

The New Hampshire Housing Finance Authority is awarded $4,275,542 million in Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction grant program funding and $700,000 in Healthy Homes funding. They will address lead hazards in 226 housing units providing safer homes for low and very low-income families with children. New Hampshire Housing Finance Authority will work with other medical and social service providers.

"This grant will support our ongoing efforts to make housing lead-safe for families with children under the age of 6 and pregnant women by working with landlords who own older rental housing stock," said Dean Christon, executive director of New Hampshire Housing. "While the program focuses on low- and moderate-income families, lead poisoning impacts families at all income levels. The recent investment by the State of New Hampshire into the Lead Paint Hazard Remediation Fund provides interest-free loans that will complement these HUD resources. With this sixth lead grant from HUD, New Hampshire Housing will be able to continue collaborating with Nashua and Sullivan County, as well as Manchester, on important lead mitigation programs."


The City of Nashua is awarded $5 million in Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction grant program funding and $700,000 in Healthy Homes funding. The City will address lead hazards in 250 housing units providing safer homes for low and very low-income families with children. The City will work with other medical and social service providers.

“The City of Nashua is thankful for the opportunity to continue to provide funding for low-income families to have a healthy and lead-safe place to call home,” said City of Nashua Mayor Jim Donchess. “Preventing lead poisoning is especially important at this time when children are spending more time than ever at home. This grant will allow us to make a significant impact on our older housing stock and protect hundreds of children from the irreversible effects of lead poisoning.”
Sullivan County is awarded $1,303,524 in Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction grant program funding and $400,000 in Healthy Homes funding. The County will address lead hazards in 60 housing units providing safer homes for low and very low-income families with children. Sullivan County will work with other medical and social service providers.

“Sullivan County would like to thank HUD for its generosity and support. As a first-time recipient of these funds, we are excited for the opportunity to make a positive impact in our communities by eliminating lead hazards and protecting young children,” said Derek Ferland, County Manager, Sullivan County. “This grant is the culmination of teamwork and it represents one of Sullivan County’s core beliefs in the value of partnerships. By working together, we can make great things happen—we can’t do this alone.”

HUD is providing these grants through its Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction (LBPHR) Grant Program to identify and clean up dangerous lead in low-income families’ homes. These grants also include more than $17 million from HUD’s Healthy Homes Supplemental funding to help communities with housing-related health and safety hazards in addition to lead-based paint hazards.
These investments will protect families and children by targeting significant lead and health hazards in over 14,000 low-income homes for which other resources are not available.

HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes promotes local efforts to eliminate dangerous lead paint and other housing-related health hazards from lower income homes; stimulates private sector investment in lead hazard control; supports cutting-edge research on methods for assessing and controlling housing-related health and safety hazards; and educates the public about the dangers of hazards in the home. Read a complete project-by-project summary of the programs awarded grants.

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